Welcome to

The Historical Metallurgy Society

Historical Metallurgy is now on-line

  • online at HMSjournal.org

  • All Historical Metallurgy content is free to access online

  • Historical Metallurgy has no publication fees for authors

  • Printed copies of Historical Metallurgy are also in full colour

Historical Metallurgy relaunched as a platinum open access journal in January 2022. This means the journal is free to access and free to publish in. Although anyone can now access Historical Metallurgy for free, it is now clear that readers and authors are continuing to subscribe to the society. HMS membership is a declaration of support for open access and free-publication by a non-commercial organisation. Historical Metallurgy  is positioned to be the premier outlet for research in any branch of historical- or archaeometallurgy.

The Historical Metallurgy Society is offering new membership bands to accompany the digital journal, to encourage the global community of historical metallurgists to take a stake in the success of the innovative venture. The new platform will achieve rapid publication of the work of researchers from around the world, whilst maintaining the Society’s long-standing reputation for high-quality publication and robust peer review.

HMS is a dynamic and exciting international forum for the exchange of information and research in historical metallurgy. For over fifty years we have covered all aspects of the history of metals and associated materials from prehistory to the present. Our members’ interests range from processes and production through to technology and economics, in a range of specialisms including historical research,  archaeology and conservation.

Research and Publications

Provide a forum for the exchange of information and research of our historical metallurgy, through our publications

Guidance

Through our collection of datasheets and links to other resources

Networking and Education

Hold regular conferences showcasing the latest research and providing networking opportunities

Conservation

Provide guidance and advice on the protection for our historical metallurgical heritage

Grants and Donations

Through our HMS awards grants for activities that further the aims of the Society.

Resources and Collections

Provides physical and digital access to our library, collections and archive resources

Links to our latest

The 109th  HMS Crucible is now available online here.

Welcome to the HMS website!

We continue to update our new website. The aim is to produce an easy to use website, with new features and content. We are always keen to improve so if you can’t find anything or hit any snags please let us know here.

Some members have had problems renewing their membership online, for which we apologise.

Note for people registered on the old website.

The accounts from the old website have now been transferred across, so when renewing your membership you can do it on-line.  Members may need to ask the system for a password reset (or indeed a password for the first time). The system should recognise the email address that the Society holds. If not please email HMS from here.

This also applies to members who may have inadvertently allowed their membership to lapse. (The new website will offer you an opportunity to pay arrears of subscriptions.)

October 2021

Latest Journal

Latest Journal available for purchase

  • Historical Metallurgy Vol. 41.2

    £10.00

 

Accidental and Experimental Archaeometallurgy 2.1 Conference.

| Current Events | No Comments
10th. to 12th. June 2022. A experimental archaeometallurgy conference with a mixture of demonstrations, practical activities and oral presentations, held at the Ancient Technology Centre, Cranborne. (more…)
Past Events

The Historic Metallurgy of Killarney

 Killarney Organised by Paul Rondelez Historical Metallurgy Society excursion to Killarney, Co. Kerry, Ireland (6…
Past Events
Research in Progress Meeting 13 November 2021 – Zoom
Past Events
A Metallurgical Miscellany & HMS AGM
Past Events
Metallurgical Miscellany Event
Past Events
HMS 50th Anniversary Conference
Past Events
100th Anniversary of Stainless Steel

About HMS

The Historical Metallurgy Society provides a forum for the exchange of information and research in historical metallurgy. It aims to gain recognition for the subject from the community at large and to be consulted when issues of preservation and recording arise.

Conservation

Provide guidance and advice on the protection for our historical metallurgical heritage

Research

Provide a forum for the exchange of information and research of our historical metallurgy, through our publications

Networking and Education

Hold regular conferences showcasing the latest research and providing networking opportunities

Support and assistance

Through our collection of datasheets, library and archive resources and our grants for research and travel

The History of HMS

Stuff here from Justine – perhaps some nice images too

Ronnie Tylecote

The Legal Stuff

The Historical Metallurgy Society Ltd is a Company limited by Guarantee (No 01442508) and a registered charity (No. 279314) Our registered office address is Linden House, Eridge Road, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, TN4 8HH.

The Articles and Memorandum of the Society can be downloaded here or are available on request from the Honorary General Secretary (Jonathan Prus, Dean Farm Oast House, Rushlake Green, Heathfield, E. Sussex. TN21 9QU. Tel 01435 830155. Email: secretary@hist-met.org or the Membership Secretary (Lesley-Ann Cowell, 17A Thorncote Road, Northill, Bedfordshire, SG18 9AQ, United Kingdom). Email: lacowell1@gmail.com.

Any personal data collected by the society is used purely to provide the services of the society. We do not share data with outside sources for advertising purposes.

HMS Council

HMS council meets twice a year, in the Spring and Autumn, to discuss the business and general running of the society. We are keen to welcome new members to council from the full spectrum of interests that the society currently serves

Meet your council

HMS President

Mike Cowell

Formerly at the British Museum, Department of Scientific Research. Worked on analytical studies of a wide range of materials and artefacts but particularly coins.

Formerly at the British Museum, Department of Scientific Research, and retired in 2004 but maintains links with the Department. Worked on analytical studies of a wide range of materials and artefacts but particularly metalwork and especially coins. Specialised in ED-XRF and AAS techniques. Former Treasurer of HMS (1991-2013) and supports the current Treasurer by preparing the gift aid claims and other matters relevant to the accounts. Chair of the Grants Committee. Non-academic interests include bell-ringing, amateur dramatics, early American blues recordings.
HMS Chair

Paul Rondelez

He obtained his thesis on Iron Age and Roman iron smelting in Belgium and his PhD degree based on research into late medieval iron production in Ireland.

Paul has a life-long interest in mining and metal production through his father's mineral collecting hobby. He obtained his Master's Degree in Archaeology at Ghent University (Belgium) with a thesis on Iron Age and Roman iron smelting in Belgium and his PhD degree based on research into late medieval iron production in Ireland. His interests also include non-ferrous metal mining in Ireland and the Irish charcoal-fired blast furnace.
HMS Secretary

Jonathan Prus

His principal interests are the unresolved aspects of bloomery technology, especially relating to draught, furnace thermal properties and slag chemistry.

Born 1950. In teaching for 10 years. Subsequently ran a company providing learning disability services. First degrees in History and Politics, then Life Sciences. Then Ph.D. at Cranfield University. Then an MBA. (The last three by part-time study.)

A member of HMS Council since 2014 and Hon. Gen. Secretary since 2017. An active member of the Wealden Iron Research Group.

Principal interests: unresolved aspects of bloomery technology, especially relating to draught, furnace thermal properties and slag chemistry. A recently developing interest in the interrelated issues of skill, cognition and ideology among ancient ironworkers.

HMS Journal Managing Editor

Matt Phelps

Matt recently finished his PhD in Archaeological Science at UCL and currently conducts freelance work on archaeological remains as a metal, slag and glass specialist.

Matt Phelps joined HMS in 2010. From 2012-2017 he was part of The Crucible editorial team before joining the Web Team in Summer 2017. Matt recently finished his PhD in Archaeological Science at UCL and currently conducts freelance work on archaeological remains as a metal, slag and glass specialist.
Joint Editor HMS Journal

Justine Bayley

Specialising in non-ferrous metal and glass working, and continues to lecture and research on various aspects of Roman and medieval metalworking.

Justine has been a member of HMS Council since the early 1980s, serving as Treasurer from 1986 to 1991 and as Joint Editor since 1990. For many years she was also a member (later chairman) of the Archaeology Committee. She led the Technology Team at the Ancient Monuments Laboratory, which became part of English Heritage/Historic England, specialising in non-ferrous metal and glass working, and ran many ‘slag days’ that offered field archaeologists hands-on training in identifying metalworking debris. She is now an Honorary Senior Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL and continues to lecture and research on various aspects of Roman and medieval metalworking.
Joint Editor HMS Journal

Tim Young

Works as a consultant to supply specialist archaeometallurgical services and analyses in the UK and Ireland.

Treasurer

Peter King

Is a historian who has recently published a book on the British Iron Industry 1490-1815.

Crucible Editor

Lorna Anguilano

Lorna has a PhD in Archaeometallurgy from the Institute of Archaeology, UCL and she is a Research Fellow at Brunel University since 2012.

Lorna Anguilano joined HMS in 2015. Since the spring of 2016 she is co-editor of the Crucible. Lorna has a PhD in Archaeometallurgy from the Institute of Archaeology, UCL and she is a Research Fellow at Brunel University since 2012.
Crucible Editor

Gill Juleff

Her primary research interest is in the early ferrous metallurgy of Asia involving fieldwork in Sri Lanka, India and China.

Gill Juleff has been a member of HMS for many years. Gill first served on Council in the late 1990s and was Chair for a term. In recent years Gill returned to the Council and took over as joint editor of the Crucible in 2017. Gill’s primary research interest is in the early ferrous metallurgy of Asia involving fieldwork in Sri Lanka, India and China. Gill teaches at Exeter University and has supervised a wide range of archaeometallurgy PhD projects.
Events Officer and Web Manager

Eleanor Blakelock

Has an interest in metallurgy of the Anglo-Saxon period, having worked on iron knives for a PhD and the metals from the Staffordshire Hoard.

Eleanor Blakelock received her PhD in 2012 from the University of Bradford studying the technology of iron knives. As part of her sandwich degree course she worked for six months with the English Heritage Technology Team studying a range of ancient materials. She was the main scientist analysing the precious metals of the Staffordshire Hoard. Her main research interest is in the archaeometallurgy of the early medieval period.
Web Team

William Hawkes

Is a professional conservator and trained jeweller, who has worked on very wide and varied projects, from Roman jewellery to napoleonic field carriage guns.

William Hawkes is a professional conservator and trained jeweller. His conservation practice has encompassed a wide array of work on very wide and varied projects ranging from Roman and Anglo Saxon stone-set jewellery in both precious and copper alloy metals to napoleonic field carriage guns and a D-20 howitzer from the first gulf war. Additionally, Bill regularly provides consultation services to various organisations in relation to researching historic objects and their metallurgy, providing reports for the purposes of preventative and remedial conservation.
Web Team

Rachel Cubitt

Is a registered finds specialist, assessing and reporting on metalworking debris and individual objects made of metals and non-metals.

As well as serving on the HMS Council Rachel Cubitt is a member of the Archives and Collections Committee and the Web Team. She has worked for MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) as a Registered Finds Specialist, assessing and reporting on metalworking debris and individual objects made of metals and non-metals. She studied Archaeology at Durham University before completing a Masters in Archaeological Science at the University of Bradford.
Chair of the HMS ACC

Vanessa Cheel

Applies metallography, optical and electron microscopy to a variety of archaeological metals.

Vanessa studied Engineering and Materials Sciences at first degree level and has a doctorate in Metallurgy & the Science of Materials which involved using light, x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons and electrons to investigate copper. Since the techniques were mastered, they’ve been applied to a variety of archaeological metals. Metallography, optical and electron microscopy are current pursuits. Small scale experimental metal working takes place in the back garden.

Her academic interests in Materials Characterisation have been blended with education and public outreach; committee experience was gained on the local Parish Council.

HMS Twitter Officer

Sophia Adams

An archaeologist specialising in later prehistoric metal artefacts with a background in fieldwork.

Dr Sophia Adams is an archaeologist specialising in later prehistoric metal artefacts with a background in fieldwork, with recent projects on examining chronology of Iron Age brooches and archaeological evidence for non-ferrous metalworking in Britain and Ireland from c.2500 BC to AD 50. She holds a PhD from the University of Leicester undertaken as a collaborative doctorate with The British Museum; and a MA and BA from University College London. Sophia is also on council for the Prehistoric Society and the Later Prehistoric Finds Group and is Branch Assistant for the North Downs Young Archaeologists Club.

Peter Halkon

His main research interests, apart from early iron production is in landscape archaeology, of the later prehistoric (particularly the Arras Culture) and Roman periods.

Dr Peter Halkon has had an interest in early iron production since his childhood, picking up Iron Age and Roman iron slag, known as “nosmun” by the farm workers, on his father’s farm at Hasholme, Holme on Spalding Moor, East Yorkshire. He is currently Senior Lecturer in Archaeology, Department of History, University of Hull. His main research interests, apart from early iron production is in landscape archaeology, particularly of the later prehistoric (particularly the Arras Culture) and Roman periods. He has directed award-winning fieldwork, co-run with Professor Martin Millett (Cambridge University) in the Foulness Valley, East Yorkshire, where discoveries included the Iron Age Hasholme logboat, large scale Iron Age iron production sites and Roman settlements. Dr Halkon continues to lead archaeology projects in the region. Formerly a teacher of history and archaeology, he was Education Officer for the Council for British Archaeology and York Archaeological Trust, taught part-time at Leeds and until recently ran the part-time Archaeology BA at Hull.

Eddie Birch

David Cranstone

Peter Northover